Category Archive for: WINTER

Wonderful Wombok.

Chinese cabbage or Wombok (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) is a wonderful cool season crop. It is the perfect late summer/autumn crop as they prefer warmish temperatures of around 18- 20 to become established and grow. They will start to form a head as soon as the temperature drops to an average of 14- 16 degrees…

Read More →

What to plant this week, 15th July.

Here in the Southern Highlands with nearly three weeks of frost, some severe, the ground is too cold to be doing and direct seed sowing this week. So this week I will be planting seeds into punnets of Asian greens, Broccoli, snow peas, English spinach, rocket and coriander. Now the English spinach, rocket and coriander…

Read More →

grow your own food my productive backyard diy gardening garden southern highlands wildes meadow burrawang robertson garden consultant grow your own good food growing mizuna

What to plant when. The 30th June.

With the end of June, I am thinking about the spring ahead and this week I am planting seed of Kale and Red and sugar loaf cabbage, just a few of each. Because I am raising my own seedlings I can control the number of plants I put in and with most plants a little…

Read More →

grow your own food my productive backyard diy gardening garden southern highlands wildes meadow burrawang robertson garden consultant grow your own good food growing frost mint

Happy winter solstice.

Here in Australia the shortest day of the year often indicates the start of colder weather, even though the days will begin to get longer, but in the garden, it is a turning point for plants and often the beginning of the signs of spring. Whist I consider myself a pagan (a member of a…

Read More →

Why I love Broccoli and a recipe to temp the non-believers.

If you regularly view my Facebook page and read my blog you will know I am a bit obsessed with growing and eating broccoli. Now if you Google the health benefits of broccoli, you will come up with a plethora of hits all extolling the benefits of this super food. Here is a couple of…

Read More →

Super spring organic fertiliser mix.

I have been using this mix for many years and have always had good results. This is a one off spring application and then I supplement with fertiliser teas or commercial liquid fertilisers at different times during the year depending on the type of plant growth I want. Historically the basis of the mix was…

Read More →

Sustainable and environmentally friendly Ideas for entertaining the kids during the winter school holidays.

Chances are if you are reading this, you have not jetted off to warmer parts for the school holidays and are looking for some ideas to keep the kids occupied during these holidays. Some people dread the thought of the kids being home from school, where as I always enjoyed the lack of hassle and…

Read More →

Growing and using Sorrel.

  Is it a herb or is it a vegetable? who cares! Tart, tangy, lemony and sour are all words used to describe this versatile green. Sorrel (Rumex acetose) is an herbaceous perennial, related to rhubarb but is even tougher and less demanding. So is one of the easiest greens that you can grow and…

Read More →

grow your own food my productive backyard diy gardening garden southern highlands wildes meadow burrawang robertson garden consultant grow your own good food chooks chickens chicken handling manual

Keeping your chicken dry in severe rain events.

If you live just about anywhere down the east coast of Australia,you would have experienced extreme rainfall last week. Here in the Southern Highlands we received over 600mm in 48 hrs, that is approximately 24 inches in the old scale. (I know it has been 40+ years since metric came in but I still think…

Read More →

Dividing your Rhubarb Plants

  In my last post on ” The Joys of Organic Rhubarb” I talk about how it is necessary to divide your plants very three or four years. I also showed you the wonderful red stems of a new plant I had purchased ┬álast season. I was anxious to have more than one of this…

Read More →

Back to Top