Posts Tagged:sustainable backyard food production

How I am using the vertical space created by my vegetable garden enclosure.

It has been nearly 12 months since I installed a steel and mesh enclosure over my vegetable garden. My initial reaction was “wow how easy is it now to access and work in the space” but with time I have started to see the advantages of the structure for use in vertical production. I had…

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Protecting your garden with an enclosure.

Are you thinking of putting in a permanent walk in enclosure for your vegetable garden and fruit orchard? In my opinion it is well worth the investment. When I first started growing vegetables the bird population took a few years to find my garden, perhaps they were too busy destroying my fruit orchard to worry…

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Deciding what to grow in your summer vegetable garden.

It is that time of the year when everyone is talking about what they are growing in their vegetable gardens and the hardware stores and nurseries are full of seedlings and seed. Sometimes this can be a bit overwhelming and you often see people buying one of everything at the nursery which makes me wonder…

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Producing your own Mesclun mix all year round.

So, what is Mesclun? according to https://en.wikipedia.org Mesclum (French pronunciation: [mɛsˈklœ̃]) is a mix of assorted small young salad greens that originated in Provence, France. I use mixed young leaves constantly, and in great quantity in salads, on sandwiches and as wilted greens. I dislike buying them as they are either wilted and dry looking…

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Finding your Mr Dependable Veg. The vegetable that grows easily in your garden and gives you a harvest all year.

I like to have one or two dependable vegetables in the garden all year. Those veggies you can put in, take very little care and yet they will always give you a great harvest. For me my top dependable is Broccoli. I don’t know if it is my soil, the position of the garden or…

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Mulch-a great addition to the garden but only if it is weed free.

I use mulch everywhere in the garden. In the vegetable garden, the orchard, the cutting garden and ornamental areas. What is mulch- It is anything that covers the soil and excludes light. It is usually some form of organic matter, but it can also be inorganic, such as stones or pebbles. Stones are only suitable…

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Wonderful Wombok.

Chinese cabbage or Wombok (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) is a wonderful cool season crop. It is the perfect late summer/autumn crop as they prefer warmish temperatures of around 18- 20 to become established and grow. They will start to form a head as soon as the temperature drops to an average of 14- 16 degrees…

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March Madness.

Early Autumn is by the far the busiest time of the year for me in the productive garden. In winter I have most of my major crops in so just do a little continuous planting of the quick harvest crops and spring though busy doesn’t have the franticness of autumn and summer is a slow…

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Why I have decided not to grow Kale this year.

I am just a bit over Kale. We are bombarded through the media with a constant dialogue on the benefits of, and recipes for this vegetable, but frankly I do not like it. Give me a plate of steamed Broccoli any day. I have been growing Kale for the past 5 or 6 years, being…

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What I am planting this week – 24th July.

Whilst we have had some cool morning in the past week, the days have been quite warm. This type of weather always lulls me into a false sense of security and I start wanting to plant some warm season crops such as beans and carrots- but the ground is still too cold for these to…

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